Preserving Nintendo's History
Pirates of the Caribbean - At World’s End (USA) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

Screenshot

(This was a joint release between us and our good friends at Gaming Alexandria!)

It’s no secret that a good majority of prototypes are very bare bones in what they have to offer. In today’s case, we’ve got a prototype of the skulls and crossbones variety; a build of Eurocom’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End,” for the Nintendo GameCube. This generously came to us through way of GamingLegend64! For those who don’t know, this game was never released on GameCube, however, it later made an appearence on the Nintendo Wii, PlayStation 2, and many more systems.

Dated April 5, 2004, this build seems to very much be mid-way through development. At this point the game is simply titled Pirates of the Caribbean with no subtitle. Booting up the game shows a splash screen that tells us this is a PSP and PlayStation 2 title, possibly a hint at what their original development platforms were. This is made even more painfully obvious when prompts for the Triangle button on a PS2 pad show up near NPCs in-game.

Screenshot

All levels from the final game are available in various states of completion, albeit some under different names. One level titled “Cannibal Isle” later became “Isla de Pelegostos” while another titled “Hell” was changed to “Davy Jone’s Locker.” Perhaps the work of Nintendo censorship is behind this?

Screenshot

Starting a new game takes you to Tortuga, the fifth level in the game, leaving the first level only accessible through the level select option at the title. This level, like a couple of the others, seems pretty far along, but your character freezes up when freeing prisoners from their cells, so not much can be explored. Speaking of freezing, the Z button lets you switch your character model at any time, but on some levels this seems to crash the game.

Screenshot

Further exploration shows that while some levels are untextured in parts and generally incomplete, most layouts seem to be established at this point. Some have a preliminary cutscene transition to secondary areas, while others are pretty barren with scarse enemies and don’t allow you to explore more than a linear path before hitting a dead end. Other differences include different camera angles, as well as a couple of levels taking place at different times of the day.

Other features include a Test Level option (complete with a “Jackanisms” test room that brings to mind something out of a David Lynch film) and some early bonus games.

Screenshot

ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Nintendo GameCube         
File:               Pirates Port-Apr 5,2004.gcm
BitSize:            10 Gbit
Size (Bytes):       1459978240
CRC32:              F1EEF03F
MD5:                1D3608F19A16F0D9D1F4296104D7E13C
SHA1:               80F0FC50A2602F1281CF84AA2D44CF330DCF50B3
SHA256:             3D49FA4E6E4322C2BA95B10C2A9E389B3CCAED1D6FC842C4779736156DA78839
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
Game Title:         Gamex
Game Serial:        GXPE (USA)
Maker Code:         78 (THQ / Play THQ)
Version:            0x00 (v1.0)
Disc Id:            1                                     

Cartridge Images

Cartridge Front

SpaceWorld 95 Tickets (Nintendo 64)
- - togemet2

High quality scans of tickets and other materials sent to attendees of Nintendo’s SpaceWorld ‘95 event.

Screenshots

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Gekkan Nintendo Tentou Demo 2004.10.1 (Japan)
- - togemet2

Screenshot

(This was a joint release between us and our good friends at Gaming Alexandria!)

Yet another Nintendo GameCube Gekkan demo disc appears! This demo is from October 2004, and features some very interesting demos for us to try out. Said disc was dumped by user MisterSheep, and generously given to us for a release. Let’s check out what this disc has to offer.

The materials on the disc are as follows: WarioWare Twisted, Mario Tennis GC, Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones, Kururin Squash!, F-Zero Climax, The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap, Pokemon Emerald, Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories, Vattroller X, and a Nintendo DS Commercial.

Not all of these are playable games, however. Some only consist of various videos and screenshots.

Another thing to note is that some of the demos have earlier content than the final version which was released. For example, in Mario Tennis GC, the sound effects for the power moves are missing. There are likely many more differences in all of these games, however we need your help to find them. If you find any differences, please let us know. We would love to hear from you!

Along with the release, the disc has also been added to redump. The entire packaging and disc itself has also been scanned and can be found below.

Special Thanks: MisterSheep for generously obtaining the disc to make this release possible.

Screenshots

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ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Nintendo GameCube           
File:               D86J01.iso
BitSize:            10 Gbit
Size (Bytes):       1459978240
CRC32:              CE786E78
MD5:                822C5914284629CA903A07A3687EDFEC
SHA1:               9949DF0C4B5AE45BB311B385E4B744078E1E35CE
SHA256:             D5331BF2580E90BAA6EF9FA58A092A94604267098631A70831556274D8523BA3
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
Game Title:         Interactive Multi Game Disc October 2004 For JPN.
Game Serial:        D86J (Japan)
Maker Code:         01 (Nintendo)
Version:            0x00 (v1.0)
Disc Id:            1

Disc / Packaging Scans

Gekkan Nintendo Tentou Demo 2004.10.1 (Japan) - Disc Front

Gekkan Nintendo Tentou Demo 2004.10.1 (Japan) - Box Front

Gekkan Nintendo Tentou Demo 2004.10.1 (Japan) - Box Back

Gekkan Nintendo Tentou Demo 2004.10.1 (Japan) - Box Left

Gekkan Nintendo Tentou Demo 2004.10.1 (Japan) - Box Right

Gekkan Nintendo Tentou Demo 2004.10.1 (Japan) - Insert

Cooly Skunk (Japan) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

Titlescreen

(This was a joint release between us and our good friends at Gaming Alexandria!)

While many unreleased games never get to see the light of day beyond blurry screenshots in old magazines of days past, Cooly Skunk (released in the US under the title Punky Skunk) is one of the few games that holds the unique distinction of having been cancelled several times before ultimately ending up released on a completely different platform than it started off on. Initially released on November 1, 1996 in Japan for the original PlayStation, Cooly Skunk was, for lack of a better term, a relative stinker that didn’t generate much buzz around release. Even the game’s lack of a real instruction manual, which instead was a simple two-page sheet of paper, hints at a troubled development that was perhaps rushed out the door sooner than it could be given the proper care that all the years of work behind it deserved.

History

Originally, development of Cooly Skunk began as a completely different project at the behest of publisher BPS of Tetris fame, who were looking to enter into the market for games oriented towards a younger audience. Developer Ukiyotei took on the project hoping to make a mascot character for BPS, but these plans fell through once BPS decided to change its direction, leaving Ukiyotei with a finished game but no publisher.

A little digging reveals that this initial completed project was most likely “Metamoru Kid Guumin”, an unreleased SFC title previewed back in 1994 as being a BPS published platformer. One look and it doesn’t take long to see some similarities in graphics style; the bottom left shot in the magazine preview below in particular shows the hero rolling through a set of enemies that look awfully similar to the mice in Cooly Skunk. The penguin and monkey transformations could possibly be what also carried over to Cooly’s snowboarding and pogostick mechanics, respectively.

Flyer

As game director Kenshi Naruse remarked in an interview about the game’s development, development on this first title started with the intent on creating something similar to the Sony/Epic title “Sky Blazer”, another Ukiyotei developed title, this time for a younger crowd. Similarities start cropping up when comparing this game with Cooly Skunk as well.

Comparison

Not wanting to completely abandon the work they put in, the project was then proposed to an unknown publisher called Visit, who suggested that the engine made in their first attempt at the game could be repurposed for a new project. At this point, Mr. Naruse saw a shift in the gaming market. As he explains, “the PlayStation had been released in Japan, but the SNES was still going strong in the US, so the project’s focus shifted to the North American market.”

With a new target market in mind, development pushed forward on a new game with a new character for the US market.

Costume

“The design of the main character Cooly and his fart attack were both at the order of Visit. They told us this incorporated the opinions of North American buyers.”

Unfortunately, even though this second iteration of the game also reached completion, the release of the PlayStation in the West had such a sharp effect on the market that the SNES was no longer viable for profits, with even buyers who were on-board with retailing the game backing out. This forced yet again the cancellation of what was apparently another finished product.

From here Ukiyotei took it upon themselves to learn the PlayStation hardware, using assets from the Cooly Skunk project as they figured their way around making another 2D platformer for the new and unfamiliar system. Naruse saw this as a golden opportunity. As he explains, “we contacted Visit and asked if they would be OK with us making it on the PlayStation again. They were fine with us using the Cooly character again, but only on the condition that stuff such as the backgrounds matched what the PlayStation was capable of.”

Comparison

Rediscovered 24 years later

Fast forward to late 2019, a BS-X “8M” cartridge for the Satellaview modem peripheral labeled as “Cooly Skunk” was found to be sitting in a display case at the retro game store “Super Potato”, located in Akihabara, Toyko for a mere 54,980 yen (about $500 USD). Until this point, there was little public knowledge that the game had ever been broadcast over Nintendo’s Satellaview service in Japan, but some searching on various Japanese webpages reveals that it had in fact at one time been broadcast in the form of a playable demo (and also as one of only 2 known broadcast titles which had a cancelled retail release). Judging by the 1996 date on the game’s title screen and the overall completeness of the game itself, it can be assumed that this broadcast was a showing of all that Visit had accomplished on the title at the time of its cancellation as a SNES title, possibly before plans to put it on the PlayStation had even been made.

Cartridge Front

Compared to the PlayStation version, the game is far simpler in level design, with most levels being a straight left-to-right affair, whereas the PlayStation version expanded the depth of levels and gave you more to explore. A lot of character graphics appear to have made it over verbatim to the retail game, but there are many level themes and graphics that are only seen in this version. All music tracks are also the same as the PlayStation version, albeit earlier renditions using the SNES soundfont.

Comparison

Special Thanks

The game was secured by user billscat-socks and a fundraiser was put together that successfully reached our goal to cover the costs of the cartridge within only one hour! We would like to thank the following people for their extremely generous donations: VZ_Blade, NijiMarii, robotortis, UHAVEBETRAYEDME, LittleToonCat, LeakyComet, bandzicoot, GaucheArtist, buffalo_weeks, bmichelmd, John, mossmouth, Kelsey Lewin, RetroRomper, Frank Cifaldi, Carnivol, OKeijiDragon and Cauterize. Also massive thanks to sanmaiwashi for helping us to preserve and dump the game. Without help from everyone, the preservation of Cooly Skunk would never have been possible.

Surprisingly, although you can only play through the game’s first three worlds before being thrown back to the title screen, some minor hacking reveals the rest of the whole game to be in here as well, including the final boss and end credits. You can find a link to this here.

Screenshot

King of the Monsters 2 (USA) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

This is a prototype of King of the Monsters 2 by Takara. The differences within this build are currently unknown. If you happen to know the game well and know the differences between the retail release and this prototype, please let us know!

Screenshots

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ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Super Nintendo Entertainment System           
File:               KingOfTheMonsters2.sfc
BitSize:            16 Mbit
Size (Bytes):       2097152
CRC32:              0F4F464B
MD5:                4A1012A7338E303D0B7CF5092FB82341
SHA1:               3FE26DE39D4409AD65F4DD869CA41F869C05B584
SHA256:             B143F7D8F0B823422A2FCB3F13CCD8687B7A654C74B1BE165B998F169BAC6DA8
----| Detection Data |---------------------------------------------
ROM Type:           HiROM
Cartridge Type:     Normal
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
New Maker Code:      N/A
Serial:              N/A
SFX SRAM Size:      0x08
Title:              KING OF THE MONSTERS2
Map Type:           0x31 (FastROM-120ns; HiROM-64KB Banks)
ROM Type:           0x00 (ROM)
ROM Size:           0x0B (16 Mbit; Ok)
SRAM Size:          0x00 (None)
Country:            0x01 (USA)
Old Maker Code:     0xA7 (Takara)
Version:            0x00 (v1.0)
Inverse Checksum:   0xC2F7 (Ok)
Checksum:           0x3D08 (Ok)

Board / Cartridge Images Cart Board

Jigsaw Party (Japan) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

This is a prototype of Jigsaw Party by Hori Electric. Build dates titled as “LINK” and “ROMW” are found at 0xFF00 in the ROM, this prototype’s ROMW build date predates the final version by six days.

[LINK]Fri Mar 25 09:10:40 1994  
[ROMW]Fri Mar 25 09:28:05 1994

Screenshots

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ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Super Nintendo Entertainment System          
File:               JigsawParty.sfc
BitSize:            8 Mbit
Size (Bytes):       1048576
CRC32:              F3F2AC30
MD5:                3F54273940292E55C4B07317C4694C68
SHA1:               E992BA74C48E5AC41479BC786F82F948FB871CE4
SHA256:             9F7C861CF2CC2FE5094977EFBF26D3E1098B7FCF00294C34F8FEAE12F68ABBF6
----| Detection Data |---------------------------------------------
ROM Type:           HiROM
Cartridge Type:     Normal
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
New Maker Code:      N/A
Serial:              N/A
SFX SRAM Size:      0xC0
Title:              JIGSAW PARTY         
Map Type:           0x31 (FastROM-120ns; HiROM-64KB Banks)
ROM Type:           0x00 (ROM)
ROM Size:           0x0A (8 Mbit; Ok)
SRAM Size:          0x00 (None)
Country:            0x00 (Japan)
Old Maker Code:     0xA1 (Hori)
Version:            0x00 (v1.0)
Inverse Checksum:   0xF760 (Ok)
Checksum:           0x089F (Ok)

Board / Cartridge Images

Cart Board

Kiosk Installation Instructions (Nintendo 64)
- - togemet2

Installation manual for a Nintendo 64 kiosk unit used across various stores within Japan.

Screenshots

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Millennium 2000 Controller Concepet Art (Nintendo 64)
- - togemet2

High quality scan of concept art for the Nintendo 64’s Millennium 2000 Controller. The art would end up being used in an advertisement featured in Nintnedo Power magazine.

Screenshots

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CES 1994 SGI Demos
- - togemet2

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(This was a joint release between us and our good friends at Gaming Alexandria!)

“From Vision to Reality Immersion”

The infamous “Shark Demo” has resurfaced. This specific demo was shown at Nintendo and SGI’s Project Reality announcement booth at CES, 1994. It was shown alongside many more tech demos which include one for racing, one for flying, and one which was a city populated by Nintendo’s main characters. Being from 1994, these demos weren’t running on finalized Nintendo Ultra 64 hardware. Instead they’re running on a high-end SGI Onyx workstation.

The Onyx served as a development kit for Nintendo 64 software during 1994 to 1995 and would cost anywhere from 100,000-250,000 USD at the time. These were used as game simulator platforms up until Nintendo decided to move to the much cheaper and less powerful SGI Indy, whose specs much more closely resemble the final Nintendo 64 (the Indy was much more affordable in comparison to the Onyx, going for about 5,000 USD).

The demo itself features a Shark named Baz, which can be controlled to move anywhere within the ocean. Whilst exploring you will come across two other sharks (appropriately named Chaz and Shaz), sunken ships, schools of fish, and old forgotten ruins. The player is able to select from a wide range of options in a menu below the game screen. It’s possible to change the time of day, the amount of fog, the camera style, and much more.

Information The shark demo is running on IRIS Performer (now known as OpenGL Performer). It is a software toolkit for 3D rendering, developed by SGI. If you have ever used Linux or Windows, you may have heard of it at one point or another as versions were produced for both platforms.

The music heard in the background of the Project Reality preview video showing off the demo is “Other Worlds” by Haim Cotton.

You can see the Shark demo in action through the following link. The demo is compatible with all SGI’s graphics architectures that support hardware texture mapping (SGI IMPACT, SGI O2 and SGI VPro) and IRIX 6.5. However, you may need to fool the inst command using ‘-m GFXBOARD=MGRAS’ and ‘set rulesoverride true’. The demo will fail if you use the XFS file system on your workstation due to an error in old IRIS Performer libraries. Mount (read-write) an EFS volume to /mnt (or any other mounting point) and use ‘export PFTMPDIR=/mnt’.

The shark demo also is not the only demo present on the discs. There are many more such as Mekton and an SGI Performer Town demo.

Mekton is the most complete game featured on the disc, and probably the most impressive. It’s a simple platformer that features a robot. Interestingly, this game is actually multiplayer!

Yes, this is the infamous demo featuring the various Nintendo characters which was shown in various magazines. Except, this time around, the characters are missing. This seems to indicate that the demo was later edited by Nintendo to include the other characters.

Another interesting game of note is a game called “Certain Impact”. This game was actually created by the same team behind Pilotwings 64. The version on this disc seems to have some differences to the other versions which have already been found. Interestingly this one has it’s resolution lowered. The game content itself consists of the player flying a plane over a town. Many different camera angles can also be taken.

Special Thanks: Diagon Swarm for their help in capturing footage of the demos for us.

Freestyle Street Soccer (USA) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

This is a prototype of Freestyle Street Soccer by Acclaim Entertainment. The date of the build is labelled as Nov 24, 2003 18:19:43 within the data, only a small amount of changes can be noted in comparison to the final US release.

Screenshots

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ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Nintendo GameCube         
File:               Freestyle Street Soccer.iso
BitSize:            10 Gbit
Size (Bytes):       1449197568
CRC32:              39983142
MD5:                D83E8E90A4391420480A36A4D3C1EA8F
SHA1:               D471734055C545771C8EA0F336C307368B313503
SHA256:             E314DF33C15A306095C04EC488C1496069376F761642BB66333534BEBAB9AA70
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
Game Title:         Freestyle Street Soccer
Game Serial:        GUVE (USA)
Maker Code:         51 (Acclaim Entertainment)
Version:            0x00 (v1.0)
Disc Id:            1                                                              

Disc Images

Disc Front

Whirl Tour (USA) (Prototype) (Sep 14th 2002)
- - togemet2

This is a prototype of Whirl Tour by Papaya Studio. It was built on September 14th, 2002, which can be seen within the disc image file. This date predates the final release of the game by a few months. Some debug information is also printed to the upper left portion of the screen during gameplay.

Screenshots

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ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Nintendo GameCube          
File:               Whirl Tour.iso
BitSize:            10 Gbit
Size (Bytes):       1459978240
CRC32:              BA231146
MD5:                C7531BBE6090CCE16C50ECCB4761B64C
SHA1:               AE53E4BA63603C08D5F4980C67451DE6B5EE1ED6
SHA256:             7F8E785F2E41D2B1D7D3D650CE3DFD97983BDE18495A148BF43C61E84951720B
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
Game Title:         Whirl Tour
Game Serial:        GWUE (USA)
Maker Code:         7D (Sierra Entertainment / Vivendi Games / Universal Interactive Studios)
Version:            0x00 (v1.0)
Disc Id:            1                                                            
Namco Museum (USA) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

This is a prototype of Namco Museum for use at E3 2002. It contains differences within the main executables and setup files.

Screenshots

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ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Nintendo GameCube           
File:               NAMCO MUSEUM.ISO
BitSize:            10 Gbit
Size (Bytes):       1459978240
CRC32:              0BECBC5F
MD5:                3FA42F9C768A7613468BA266D1CFC53F
SHA1:               11DE3020A71556524E2FA3B923B1DBC482236497
SHA256:             916B2D7B3E37CEB6461EF270B9068CB198B6396B3267DB9F77E517374D02C897
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
Game Title:         NAMCO MUSEUM
Game Serial:        GNME (USA)
Maker Code:         AF (Namco Bandai Games)
Version:            0x01 (v1.1)
Disc Id:            1                                                               

Disc Images

Disc Front

Super Nova (USA) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

This is a prototype of Super Nova by Taito. The differences within this build are currently unknown. If you happen to know the game well and know the differences between the retail release and this prototype, please let us know!

Screenshots

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ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Super Nintendo Entertainment System         
File:               SuperNova.sfc
BitSize:            8 Mbit
Size (Bytes):       1048576
CRC32:              87AEB5B9
MD5:                AB2513C8D1388D2FD9FE07496ED24D3A
SHA1:               9819B3D97993EA562E5AD0A5377B1BD86F42555E
SHA256:             9A0477B1F34293CED5160A3B061C23F105068ECE12956A67A3C5BE9889BAAEE5
----| Detection Data |---------------------------------------------
ROM Type:           HiROM
Cartridge Type:     Normal
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
New Maker Code:      N/A
Serial:              N/A
SFX SRAM Size:      0xFF
Title:              SUPER NOVA           
Map Type:           0x31 (FastROM-120ns; HiROM-64KB Banks)
ROM Type:           0x00 (ROM)
ROM Size:           0x0A (8 Mbit; Ok)
SRAM Size:          0x00 (None)
Country:            0x01 (USA)
Old Maker Code:     0xC0 (Taito)
Version:            0x00 (v1.0)
Inverse Checksum:   0xCBEA (Ok)
Checksum:           0x3415 (Ok)

Board / Cartridge Images

Super Nova (USA) (Prototype) - Cart Front

Super Nova (USA) (Prototype) - PCB

Arcana (USA) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

This is a prototype of Arcana by HAL Laboratory. The differences within this build are currently unknown. If you happen to know the game well and know the differences between the retail release and this prototype, please let us know!

Screenshots

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ROM Information

----| File Data |--------------------------------------------------
System:             Nintendo - Super Nintendo Entertainment System          
File:               Arcana.2F0D.sfc
BitSize:            8 Mbit
Size (Bytes):       1048576
CRC32:              9ED6F34D
MD5:                549F0E50BAF3F80C374C805CFEA313AE
SHA1:               6080A6339F212B8BF9CC63435A85F730C060AF7C
SHA256:             965F16BB86E5737DD7CB0F896FFC5743EC614445EBC7ABB5B8FED391149D08E9
----| Detection Data |---------------------------------------------
ROM Type:           LoROM
Cartridge Type:     Normal
----| Header Data |------------------------------------------------
New Maker Code:      N/A
Serial:              N/A
SFX SRAM Size:      0xFF
Title:              ARCANA               
Map Type:           0x20 (SlowROM-200ns; LoROM-32KB Banks)
ROM Type:           0x02 (ROM + Save RAM)
ROM Size:           0x0A (8 Mbit; Ok)
SRAM Size:          0x03 (64 Kbit)
Country:            0x01 (USA)
Old Maker Code:     0xB6 (HAL Laboratory)
Version:            0x00 (v1.0)
Inverse Checksum:   0x2F0D (Ok)
Checksum:           0xD0F2 (Ok)

Board / Cartridge Images

Cart Board

Spider-Man 4 (USA) (Prototype)
- - togemet2

(This was a joint release between us and our good friends at Gaming Alexandria!)

Screenshot

Yet another prototype has been dumped and released to you all! This time we will be taking a look at the unreleased game developed by Eurocom, Spider-Man 4 on the Nintendo Wii. This build was found on an RVT-H Wii development kit. These development kits are very similar to your normal Wii, however they use an internal hard drive as opposed to an optical drive. Due to there being a lack of an optical drive, there are also buttons on the front to mimic the functions of the optical drive. Said development kit was teased on twitter a few months ago, and thanks to the generous GamingLegend64, we now have a copy to release and preserve.

Gameplay

There isn’t all that much in terms of the main story to play, it all seems very spaced out and incomplete. Judging from the title, there were only two parts that you can play through. Both of them lead to untextured and very unfinished stages as seen in the screenshot below. Selecting the first part will bring the player to a building top, where there are various places for Spider-Man to swing on from building to building, there are a few enemies in your way, too. Luckily for us there are many, many debug features to take a look at, including other stages that actually contain textures.

Screenshot

Debug Features!

Strap yourselves in and get ready for a whole heap of debug content! On the main menu is an option which will allow the player to access all sorts of debug options and tests. The first option available to us is the “Gameplay Prototypes”. This option brings Spider-Man to a colorful hub of sorts, where the player can choose what moves they want to test out. Walking into each gate will transport Spider-Man to that specific test. As you can see in this screenshot, there are quite a few options. Let’s get started shall we?

I guess we’ll start off with the test right in front of us, the web moves test.

Screenshot

There are many different areas we can do this test, here I chose the one which resembles a city. If you look closely, you can see neon green poles on the sides of each building. This is where Spider-Man will swing from his webs. You do this by getting close enough to them and holding the B button. It’s actually quite fun!

Screenshot

The next test room we’ll take a look at is the Photography Test.

Screenshot

This one is quite empty, with only a few boxes holding shapes. Whenever the player gets close to the box, a camera icon will appear in the top left. As far as I can tell, the camera function is incomplete. Meaning there isn’t much to do nor see in this room.

Now let’s move to the more interesting rooms! Camera Test.

Screenshot

This one features various different statues and environments to see how the camera would react to those sudden changes. Here you’ll find large drops, small drops, and various tunnels going in either directions. There are quite a bit of areas in this one. Here’s me…er- Spider-Man running down the tunnel test.

Screenshot

The other test rooms within this game consist of wall-running, jumping, climbing and other self explanatory tests. Even after all that, we’re still not done discussing the debug features. I wasn’t kidding when I said there was heaps!

Here’s a Combat Test which can be accessed from the main menu once again.

Screenshot

Spider-Man is trapped in a small room with various goons. He is able to jump on their shoulders and shoot webs at them. The combat system takes a little time to get used to, but you’ll eventually get the hang of it.

Another one from the main menu is the World Sim test. This is a pretty nice one. It’s more of a cutscene test. The player can’t move, instead, they have to watch whilst Spider-Man looks onward at the busy city below. It starts off right near Spider-Man and slowly zooms up the road, giving a nice and clear view. Voices of the citizens and cars below can also be heard.

Screenshot

Clicking the “Art Satellite Areas” test brings up a whole menu of areas that would’ve likely appeared in the final game. These are quite nicely textured, detailed, and all seem to be mostly complete, minus some parts behind the player as well as the whole emptiness of these areas. The photo in the area below represents China Town.

Screenshot

It’s easy to tell that there was quite a lot of effort put into making these areas look appealing to the player. Shame that this game never got a release until now.

The next option right below Art Satellite Areas are the FX tests. These are even more impressive than the area tests. There are various stages (similar to the ones for the previous test) which take use of various effects. Quite a few actually, as seen in the screenshot below. Police lights, explosions, etc.

Screenshot

Once again, very nicely detailed and it’s clear a lot of effort was put in.

The final debug option we’ll take a look at here is the Asset Viewer. As the name implies, we can use this to get a nice and clear view of each character within the game. You can also choose from various different options to change the background, camera angle, and more. There are not that many character models present, just Spider-Man, the goons we saw earlier in the combat test, and a large man which doesn’t seem to have had any animations done on it.

Screenshot

Oddities!

As you would expect from an unreleased game, there are quite a few odd occurrences which happen during gameplay. You might have noticed that a mouse cursor is visible in most of the screenshots, this actually isn’t from my emulator. This can be triggered by plugging a GameCube controller into the first port and moving the C-Stick. This will cause the mouse pointer to appear in game. Clicking with it also brings up a small text box saying “Spider-Man 4”. So far I’ve found no use for this whatsoever.

Another odd occurrence is what the game displays as when using the Dolphin Emulator. It shows the game is “Dead Space: Extraction”, another game that was developed by Eurocom. This seems to imply that this unreleased Spider-Man 4 game was running on the same engine as Dead Space.

Information

Note: This game will not run on the latest version of Dolphin. Instead, use Dolphin 5.0-8582.

Special Thanks

Hard4Games for their incredible video coverage of the game. GamingLegend64 for generously providing this game for us to release.

ROM Information

Name: Spiderman (Disc 1, Revision 0)
Game ID: RZJE69 (0001000030303030)
Country: USA
Maker: Electronic Arts (69)
Apploader Date: 2009/06/18